Here's Another (Three Michelin-Starred) Restaurant That Will Make You Pay Before You Eat!4

Alinea & Brooklyn Fare are the only two three-Michelin starred restaurants in America that make you pay for the majority of your meal before you eat your meal. But it looks like we’ll get another entry to that category In Europe, at Madrid’s DiverXO, which is moving to the “Hotel NH Eurobuilding” (what a name!) in July. Chef David Muñoz says he’s adopting a ticketing system as NO SHOWS are a problem. Check out the details right over here. 

“Unlike past Gelinaz! events which have gotten flack for their lack of female chefs and abundance of topless female servers, this event featured several female chefs in the kitchen including Gabrielle Hamilton, Rosio Sanchez, Christina Tosi, and Ana Ros.”
Props to Eater’s Hillary Dixler for scoping out the female chef scene over at last night’s Gelinaz! event at WD-50. For those who aren’t in the know, Gabrielle Hamilton is the chef at Prune, Rosio Sanchez is the pastry chef at Noma, Christina Tosi is the co-founder of Momofuku Milk Bar, and Ana Ros is the chef at Kobarid in Solvenia. Rock on. (Source: Eater). 
"Of course, we need further studies to determine whether the cherry-scented water vapor emitted from e-cigarettes is really harmful. But in the meantime, here’s a short list of other things in restaurants that we know are harmful but aren’t yet banned: Sizzling-hot fajita skillets. Noise. High heels on slippery hardwood floors. Knives. That thing when Koreatown waiters almost hit your face with white hot buckets of charcoal. Sharp toothpicks that hold together pastrami sandwiches. My buddy Sarah after three martinis. Her husband Mark after two chardonnays. Vegan food. Chopsticks, if used as a replacement for Q-tips. And porterhouse steak bones, if filed down and used as javelin spears." 
From my Eater column today! Let’s overturn the e-cig ban!

"Of course, we need further studies to determine whether the cherry-scented water vapor emitted from e-cigarettes is really harmful. But in the meantime, here’s a short list of other things in restaurants that we know are harmful but aren’t yet banned: Sizzling-hot fajita skillets. Noise. High heels on slippery hardwood floors. Knives. That thing when Koreatown waiters almost hit your face with white hot buckets of charcoal. Sharp toothpicks that hold together pastrami sandwiches. My buddy Sarah after three martinis. Her husband Mark after two chardonnays. Vegan food. Chopsticks, if used as a replacement for Q-tips. And porterhouse steak bones, if filed down and used as javelin spears." 

From my Eater column today! Let’s overturn the e-cig ban!

Danny Meyer’s The Modern has essentially eliminated its tasting menu and substituted it with a shorter, cheaper, prix-fixe menu. This isn’t because diners are spending less money. It’s because diners want to spend less time in the restaurant. Will other restaurants follow suit? Perhaps. 
Click through for my full essay on Eater.

Danny Meyer’s The Modern has essentially eliminated its tasting menu and substituted it with a shorter, cheaper, prix-fixe menu. This isn’t because diners are spending less money. It’s because diners want to spend less time in the restaurant. Will other restaurants follow suit? Perhaps. 

Click through for my full essay on Eater.

Male Chef Leaving Cafe Boulud, Will Be Replaced by Another Male Chef.4

Chef Gavin Kaysen, the talented chef of Cafe Boulud on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, will leave the Dinex Group to open up a restaurant in his hometown of Minneapolis. New York’s loss is Minnesota’s gain; I can’t wait to visit. Kaysen will be replaced by Cafe Boulud’s current chef de cuisine, Aaron Bludorn.

It would’ve been nice for the Michelin-starred venue to have replaced Kaysen with a woman, as there isn’t a single female executive chef at any of Boulud’s 10 restaurants in the U.S. or Canada. Of course, Jean-Georges Vongerichten doesn’t have any female chefs heading up his U.S. restaurants, nor does Stephen Starr nor David Chang nor John Besh nor others.

So technically speaking, Daniel is not an outlier. Carry on.

OpenTable Launches Alerts for Impossible Reservations4

These bespoke text-message notifications will exponentially reduce the amount of time you spend hitting refresh on OpenTable. That’s the good news. The bad news is that these alerts might make impossible tables even more impossible by increasing the pool of diners seeking such impossibility. That’s the tradeoff. Or something like that. I’d say pick your poison, but your poison has really been picked for you.

I’ll be joining Eater as a restaurant critic and a data guy! Am humbled to be working with other new hires like steakmaster Nick Solares, jack-of-all trades Robert Sietsema, and national restaurant editor Bill Addison. Am also stoked to say I’ll continue filling The Price Hike & The Bad Deal with great content, both original and from around the web. I’m very grateful to all of who’ve read The Hike & The Deal over the past three years! You’re the BEST!

I’ll be joining Eater as a restaurant critic and a data guy! Am humbled to be working with other new hires like steakmaster Nick Solares, jack-of-all trades Robert Sietsema, and national restaurant editor Bill Addison. Am also stoked to say I’ll continue filling The Price Hike & The Bad Deal with great content, both original and from around the web. I’m very grateful to all of who’ve read The Hike & The Deal over the past three years! You’re the BEST!

“I think we’ve had a little bit difficulty connecting to the Bolivians, so one of our challenges is to get local diners to frequent us as happily and as often as people who come from Australia or Europe or the United States.”
Claus Meyer, a co-owner at Noma, talks with Eater’s Amy McKeever about the challenges of Gustu, his restaurant in Bolivia where an extended wine-paired tasting menu costs about $130. That’s much less than a $900 dinner at Noma, but a few dollars more than what Bolivians are used to spending (or can afford to spend) on food. 
“We’ve raised most of the money that we need to renovate a new place and for permits and all those big-ticket items [for which] I’m willing to give up equity for my business. But as a business person and someone that’s put all of my money and two years of my life into City Grit, I wasn’t willing to give up more equity for money that’s going to sit in someone’s bank account for 15 years.”

Sarah Simmons, who’s $100,000 Kickstarter went unfunded, talks with Eater about the difficulties of keeping financial ownership over City Grit, the restaurant and culinary salon she founded. 

City Grit hosts a rotating series of pop-up dinners throughout the year, often giving young chefs a chance to try out their ideas in New York before committing to a brick-and-mortar institution. For the culinary community, it is among our most important spaces. 

Simmons is currently seeking funding on the City Grit website.